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Community Outreach

GATHERING INPUT FROM THOSE HIT HARDEST BY POOR AIR QUALITY

Stark disparities in air quality exist among communities across California, and even within the city limits of San Leandro.

With support from the California Air Resources Board and the Bay Area Air Resources Board, San Leandro 2050 is exploring how people who live in neighbhorhoods with low air quality see future threats from climate change.

We seek to amplify the voices of residents who live in neighborhoods where air pollution contributes to disproportionately high rates of health problems, like asthma, cardiovascular disease, and low birth weight.

 

Our ultimate goal is to make San Leandro a climate-resilient, livable city for all.

San Leandro impacted neighborhoods chart.

Based on CalEnviroScreen data, Montclair has the lowest environmental burden in the state, and Fresno highest—underscoring significant disparities between affluent communities and where more people live in poverty. The same inequities exist between different neighborhoods in our own city.

San Leandro 2050 Neighborhood Listening Sessions

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Since 2020, nearly 700 San Leandro residents have shared their opinions about air quality and climate change priorities, via online surveys during the pandemic, and at community events like this one in 2022. To broaden the reach of online listening sessions, we shared recordings (in both English and Spanish), encouraging residents who were not able to attend live to voice their opinions.

We want to hear from you! Give us your opinion about air quality and climate change priorities for San Leandro. Please watch this video from our open houses held in 2020-2021  and then give us your input by filling out this form. Thank you!

¡Queremos escuchar de ti! Danos tu opinión sobre las prioridades de calidad del aire y cambio climático para San Leandro. Mire este video de una jornada de puertas abiertas celebrada este verano y luego dénos su opinión al completar este formulario. ¡Gracias!

This project, funded through grants by the California Air Resources Board and the Bay Area Air Resources Board, regional and state initiatives that put billions of Cap-and-Trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy, and improving public health and the environment — particularly in disadvantaged communities.

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